Posts tagged ‘Autumn Statement’

End Of An Era

“Mr Speaker, I am abolishing the Autumn Statement.”

2016 has already delivered much in the way of political upheaval. But no one was expecting this! Granted, there was much laughter as the new Chancellor told MPs that, having done away with the traditional spring Budget and Autumn Statement, he would be moving to an autumn Budget and a Spring Statement. (He had to clarify that this really was a significant change because the Spring Statement wouldn’t actually say much.)

Thus concluded the only truly dependable projection from HM Treasury. What did the rest of this, the last ever Autumn Statement, have to tell us?

Reports of the event were dominated by the forecast effects of Brexit. Of course, nobody knows what these will actually be. The Office for Budget Responsibility plumped for lower growth, higher inflation and more borrowing than before. Its guesses are worth no more than the Bank of England’s – though they were, interestingly, very different. The Bank, in its Inflation Report out earlier this month, had GDP for 2018 and 2019 coming in at +1.5% and +1.6%. The OBR thinks the answer will be +1.7% and +2.1%. Counter-intuitively the OBR is also forecasting lower CPI inflation (2.5% and 2.1% as against 2.7% and 2.5% over on Threadneedle Street). It is likely mere coincidence that higher growth and lower inflation will have combined to produce a less alarming debt forecast. In any event, the inconsistency serves to demonstrate nicely the speculative nature of all these kinds of exercise.

Regular readers will know how important the level of gilt yields is too. They have fallen since the Budget and this has delivered a projected bonanza of £24bn over the course of the next five years. That is the impact of a fall in gilt yields of all of 0.3%. (So long as they don’t go up again, the nation’s finances are safe. Well, safeish.)

The Chancellor briefly alluded to longevity and suggested that the next Parliament consider doing something about it. This is a good idea: the state pension bill is forecast to reach £101.9bn in fiscal 2020-21, up from £91.5bn this year. And that represents a compound annual increase of only 2.7%. More aggressive inflation, or a higher rate of earnings growth would push the cost higher.

We have no idea what growth and inflation will be over the next few years. Nor does the Treasury have much, if any, control over interest rates. There are, however, material numbers over which it does have some say. And in this febrile political environment, with Brexit on the horizon (or possibly not), public debt already forecast to reach 90% of GDP soon and no medium-term prospect of balancing the books, what is the expected net impact of the Chancellor’s policy decisions? Why, to widen the budget deficit by £4bn next year, £6bn in 2018-19 and £8bn the year after that! And those numbers are predicated on the basis of 43 discrete policy changes covering everything from tax reliefs available to museums to the exemptions regime for social sector rent downrating. Taxes up, borrowing up and the tax code as complex as ever. The ghost of Gordon Brown still hovers over the building whose magnificent remodelling he instigated all those years ago.

But – as many have felt, at times, this year – enough of politics. Despite the mainly Brexit-related fuss it caused the Autumn Statement contained nothing to suggest that the management of the country’s economy is to undergo change. The UK’s national debt remains problematic, and the Treasury seemingly content to be at the mercy of future events. That, from a pure investment perspective, is the key message from the last Autumn Statement in history.

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25/11/2016 at 5:10 pm

Devils In The Detail

So another Autumn Statement has been and gone. As is now traditional the Chancellor tried to lift the mood by repeating some of the more substantial announcements made in his previous set-piece appearances. But there were changes too. Most significant among these was the U-turn on tax credit reform, which would have hit the incomes of low earners hard (for those who have not yet seen the headlines the BBC’s “key points” summary is as good a place to look as any). It was widely and accurately reported that this had become affordable due to improvements in the OBR’s forecasts for the British economy, delivering £27bn of extra pie in the fiscal sky between now and the end of the current parliament.

As usual, there was a gap between spin and reality on the matter. In his speech to the Commons, Mr Osborne attributed his windfall as follows:

“This improvement in the nation’s finances is due to two things. First, the OBR expects tax receipts to be stronger. A sign that our economy is healthier than thought. Second, debt interest payments are expected to be lower – reflecting the further fall in the rates we pay to our creditors.”

Higher tax receipts can indeed signify economic growth. The OBR’s growth forecasts, however, haven’t changed much. In a rather lower-profile address given by Robert Chote, OBR Chairman, he gave the following additional information on this topic:

“[T]he underlying fiscal position looks somewhat stronger over the medium term than it did in July, before you take into account the Autumn Statement measures. This in part reflects the recent strength of income tax and corporation tax. But it also reflects better modelling of National Insurance Contributions and a correction to the modelling of VAT deductions.”

Ah.

In fact, looking at the data presented at Mr Chote’s press conference, the impact of these modelling changes tots up to +£12.6bn over the five fiscal years to 2019-20.

Now let’s look at the rates demanded by those creditors. Here is how the forecasts for the UK’s central government gross debt interest have changed since the summer:

Summer Budget Autumn Statement
Fiscal Year £bn £bn
2015-16 46.7 46.5
2016-17 51.1 51.0
2017-18 55.9 54.2
2018-19 57.2 55.7
2019-20 58.5 57.3
TOTAL 269.4 264.7

 

£4.7bn out of such large totals is not a huge amount (less than 2% in fact), but in policy terms it is material, equivalent to the entire cost between now and 2020 of increasing the personal allowance to £11,000, the single biggest giveaway of the last Budget.

Underlying the relatively modest reduction in the projected cost of debt interest is a similarly modest reduction in projected gilt yields. The OBR data for these is scrambled between different documents for the Budget and Autumn Statement, which possibly explains why no media source appears to have covered it. But the point is that the average market interest rate assumption for the next five years has fallen all of 0.4% since July, from 2.7% to 2.3%. It is on such details that material elements of this country’s fiscal policy now have to be based.

Of course movements in gilt yields have not always been modest. And what ought to concern us is the extent to which they will impact the exchequer should they begin to rise again over coming quarters. Two short years ago – before cheap oil abolished inflation – the ten year gilt yield stood a full 1% higher at 2.8% as against 1.8% today. The Autumn Statement of 2013 put average interest rates for 2015-2019 at 3.8%. What would a forecast change of +100bp do the £4.7bn bonanza secured by a change of -40bp? A proportionate adjustment would wipe out £12bn at a stroke – exactly the amount of the extra spending on defence announced by the Prime Minister on Monday (to be spread over the next ten years.)

Look further back and the message is equally clear. The first half of 2011 was not exactly the cheeriest of times: Greece was collapsing, emergency monetary measures were in full swing and panic was pushing gold to record highs. Still the ten year gilt yielded more than 3.8% for much of the time. And in the years before the credit crunch began to bite the average was about 4.5%.

Neither is the cost of debt linked entirely to interest rates: there is inflation to consider as well. Of the UK’s £1.5trn nominal value of outstanding debt, over £300bn nominal is index-linked to RPI. Since July the OBR’s RPI inflation assumption has been cut by 0.2%; the average for the next five years is down to 2.4% from 3.1% a year ago. And talking of inflation, the CPI measure – which now governs increases to pensions and other benefits – has also seen forecast falls since the summer. The OBR’s average for the next five years is 0.5% lower now than it was last year, 1.3% versus 1.8%.

But then again, who really is talking of inflation? Not the Chancellor. Neither the word nor the concept made a single appearance in his speech on Wednesday. Still, Mr Chote had something to say:

“[W]e still expect inflation to kick up over the coming year as favourable base effects drop out. We expect it to rise slightly more quickly than in July thanks to greater pressure from unit labour costs.”

Something to think about there, possibly.

In summary the Autumn Statement carried an element of political drama but the macroeconomic substance remained hidden away – when it was not being positively spun, that is. Mr Osborne seems to have a rare knack for making political capital from fiscal policy, rather like his predecessor Mr Brown. But the evolution of the country’s debt position and the official forecasts on which policy is based have relatively little to do with him and much more to do with interest rates (and inflation).

27/11/2015 at 4:59 pm

Turning The Tide

There are a number of notable points which could be made about the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement yesterday. The political as well as the economic mood has clearly moved in his favour. Some of the measures announced, like the establishment of a moving target for the state pension age, were substantial. And of course the Office for Budget Responsibility has revised its economic forecasts up, meaning that the forecast level of government indebtedness has come down.

It is not the first time that this has happened. At the time of the Autumn Statement in 2010 and of the 2012 Budget, OBR debt to GDP projections drifted ever-so-slightly lower, with the peak level of indebtedness on a Treaty basis coming down by 0.8% and 1.2% respectively – before shooting up again in subsequent reports. But the difference this time is much more material: back in March, debt to GDP was forecast to peak at 100.8% in fiscal 2015-16; now the peak is to reach “only” 94.7% in the same year.

The full text of the OBR’s Economic and fiscal outlook attributes the difference to higher nominal GDP and lower borrowing about equally over the two years 2014/15 – 2015/16. It is worth quoting the following directly from the text:

While most public discussion of economic forecasts focuses on real GDP, the key driver of our fiscal forecast is nominal GDP – the cash value of economic activity – and its composition. The level of nominal GDP is higher across the forecast period than in March. … Whole economy inflation – as measured by the GDP deflator – is little changed from March.

In recent years there has been some debate about the possibility that governments would try to inflate their way out of debt (e.g.). Some economists even advocated this as policy. Regular readers will know that the idea isn’t a serious one – and the UK’s new numbers give some proof of this. In debt terms, the tide might just have turned, and higher inflation has played no part in this projection.

What we can say is that a little growth goes a long way. While the forecast for peak debt to GDP has fallen by over 6%, the cumulative change in real GDP to 2015 since the OBR’s March forecast is only +1.3%. As well as growing the denominator of the debt / GDP calculation, higher growth also reduces planned expenditure and increases projected tax receipts, thereby causing the cash amount of borrowing to fall. For economies with uncomfortably high debt, a growth spurt is the best possible cure.

This week’s data from across the Atlantic is warmly encouraging in this regard. US GDP for the third quarter was revised up in the second estimate to 3.6%, right at the top of the forecast range and the highest rate for one and a half years; confidence has rebounded from the blip of the shutdown; and unemployment fell unexpectedly to 7%, its lowest level in five years. (It is interesting to observe that this is the level which, arriving in 2014, was supposed to see the end of the Fed’s QE3. The press conference at which this was announced panicked the markets. So far this afternoon, by contrast, the S&P 500 is up by almost 1%.) If this is all beginning to add up to a proper global recovery it will be the best possible news for indebted developed-world economies.

As always we need to be careful. Reducing borrowing over the medium term will require continued fiscal discipline, and to borrow one of the Chancellor’s phrases, it can be human nature to focus on “fixing the roof” only when we are being rained on from a great height. And we should not give him too much credit either: he boasted proudly that the budget deficit as a share of GDP is expected to have fallen by 11.1% over the nine years following 2009-10. Another way of putting it is that it will have taken nearly a decade of continued borrowing for the UK to have not quite balanced its books again. Back in 1993 on the other hand, when the deficit peaked at 7.9% of GDP, it took only seven years to bring it up to a surplus of 3.5%: a larger improvement of 11.4% in total.

Still, falling government indebtedness is good news, and long may it continue. With a strengthening and prolonged global recovery there is every reason to think that it will.

06/12/2013 at 3:57 pm


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